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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. claims fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recess
, as the presidential candidates focus on the economy, what do the mixed signals mean? we get perspective from two economists. >> woodruff: then, we go on board navy ships in the persian gulf to watch a massive military exercise aimed at securing the strait of hormuz. >> we need to be prepared to deal with mines go in the water. this exercise is focused on the mine trip and demonstrating our able to clear mines. we have to be able to do that. >> suarez: the chinese communist party ousts a once-powerful politician and prepares to unveil its new leadership. margaret warner has our update. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: and from our "american graduate" series, we take an encore look at the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a-- i would probably be let up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support o
are really pretty slack, and for government to withdraw support from the economy as the tories have done since 2010 has really been a recipe for a double dip recession and sure enough we have got one. >> you actually have got an interesting case study, america is a much bigger economy than the uk but our two countries were dealing with the financial crisis more or less in the same way. >> yes. >> a new government came in, not just austerity but masochism that is being -- >> by each other --. there is masochism in the uk with respect to the economic, a collector austerity around europe which is related, a separate point. >> the uk laboratory has been used to test the thesis that by contracting government spending you presto expand private enterprise. it hasn't worked and that way we ended up with a simple national -- >> why is that? >> because the private sector is not spending, sitting on 750 billion pounds of cash and not investing, consumers have their wits frightened out of them, export markets are slack, presto, if all of the indicators are point manager the wrong direction you have
's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a politician. as a respected economist considered to be above party politics he was chosen to form a new technocratic government. it put him at the center of the european debt crisis confronting rising interest rates that led to greece, ireland, and portugal to seek bailouts. his ability to turn calamity into opportunity has revived his nickname "super mario." i have pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. welcome. >> delighted to be here. >> rose: i see that you have said that you're not going to run for prime minister? >> no, i can confirm that i will not be a candidate. i believe i couldn't even be a candidate because, as you mentioned, i am senator for life. so candidates are candidates inn order to become members of parliament. >> rose: and you're senator for life. >> yes. >> rose: do you want to stay as prime minister? >> of course i will not. i will-- the whole government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for the political parties, depending on the outc
and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million and a half. now we're down around 750,000 in terms of housing starts so we're kind of half of what i view as normal. >> reporter: one wild card for builders is the ongoing uncertainty about the bush tax cuts. subkowiak says if those tax cuts aren't extended some potential buyers could put a hold on buying a new house. diane eastabr
the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivating consumers to spend? >> i frankly don't buy that too much. i think there's a problem because you hurt people's interest income, and people with interest income could spend more, and the problem is people aren't able to access the low rates. you need a very high credit score to get the low rates and everybody that can access the low rates has done it, and if the rates were higher banks wouldn't require as high of a credit score. they're selling what they can through fany and fedy freddie. it's about credit scores and not interest rates. >> susie: aside from what banks are doing. what has to change, to change consumer attitudes about spending? >> the economy has to get better. we've had this in the summer for the past two or three years in a row, and every economy rebounds. if we're going to have a rebound in the holiday season, that could be great and help to put people back to work, and allow them to spend a little bit more freely. we also have a long holiday season. november starts out on a thursday, which means thanksgiving comes earl
billion. it is europe's largest -- fourth largest economy. gavin hewitt has more from madrid. >> lines of police outside the education ministry in madrid tonight. teachers protested here against cuts. they came onto the street at the government's announced the most severe round of budget savings so far. these latest austerity measures are widely seen as paving the way for a full-scale bailout. >> [spending -- speaking spanish] >> the minister of finance said he heard 2012 would be the last year the economy would shrink. another minister described it as a crisis budget designed to exit the crisis. this austerity budget aims to find savings of 40 billion joerres next year. each government department would how to make cuts of 90%. public-sector pay will be frozen for another year, and the retirement age is set to rise. >> just a few weeks ago, europe believed it had achieved a breakthrough. the european central bank said it would help come -- countries like spain by buying their bonds and reducing their borrowing costs. but there was a catch, spain would have to apply for a rescue and it
. >> they are the ones who own the businesses and they are the ones who are putting the money back in the economy and providing the jobs so i believe you know that would be a better plan for us. >> woodruff: 24-year-old athletic trainer sarah abrams also voted for mr. obama. but this time around, she says she's undecided. >> i'm not sure yet. i'm still like you know like watching and basically researching so i'll make my decision soon. >> woodruff: o.s.u. senior krystina hollowell says she identifies with the republican party, but has more liberal views on social issues than candidate mitt romney. do you know how you are going to vote yet? >> no, to be honest, i really don't. i'm more of i like lean towards republican but then socially i'm romney is like very against like abortions and like birth control and that type of stuff for like women and same with like gay marriages. i'm more towards like obama's plan. >> woodruff: in fact, peter levine, director of the center for information and research on civic learning and engagement at tufts university says one set of issues that could hurt romney wi
evidence that international sanctions over tehran's nuclear program are damaging the economy. now to the presidential race here in the u.s. and both mitt romney and barack obama are busy swatting up and rehearsing for the first television debate this wednesday. polls show the republican candidate is trailing president obama in the crucial swing states. one of them is of course ohio where early voting gets under way tomorrow. from there our north america editor reports. >> ♪ the boys are back in town ♪ >> the boys are indeed back in town yet again. they call this the buckeye state for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next f
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)